Summer Daze at Ocean Beach part 2/2

Ocean Beach, San Diego

Continued from part 1.

Put the world behind you, and enjoy the best part of Ocean Beach.

The dense and plentiful sand, a grandest sky, the endless water, the resonance of unending tides. OB has it all in wait.

Further out, is the amazing Ocean Beach Municipal Pier, standing tall since 1966, This is my favorite escape, within an escape. The OB pier is where one takes good time, slow walk and let the worries of the wold fade out with each step out. Among you will be those with fishing poles, casting out for good catch. Maybe, I will someday join them.

Look out and far, especially on a clear day.

SDCC 2013 1292

Also, the OB Pier is the longest concrete pier on the West Coast at 1,971 feet (601 m).

Ocean Beach, San Diego

Looking over, the pier is a great place to watch surfers in action. Like much of California’s Coast, OB is a prime spot for the surfing culture.

Here in OB, the surfing lifestyle has its early roots. Surfing was been traced back as far as 1916 when local lifeguard Charlie Wright borrowed a wooden surfboard from the Hawaiian Olympic swimmer and surfing’s living legend, Duke Kahanamoku. Wright went on to produce more boards, gave lessons, and promoted surfing to the local area. Afterwards, that surfing community grew as the sporting became native to San Diego.

Photo Jul 22, 5 20 35 AM

Some surf late, enjoying the best of the golden Californian sunset.

Ocean Beach, San Diego

Ocean Beach, San Diego

For me, I often go for another walk on the great OB pier. The coming night offers a different reward for those looking for quality alone time. Also, one could enjoy a more illuminate view of the coast looking back. On my last visit, the camera battery power faded. So, I present these views from the same place from a previous time some years ago, upon the night of a Harvest Moon.

From here, there are no more words..

Ocean Beach, San Diego

Ocean Beach, San Diego

Ocean Beach, San Diego

The jellyfish swarms of Monterey Bay

Look around and down over the piers of the Monterey Bay, California, especially next to the London Bridge Pub at its second Municipal Wharf. You will likely find swarms of jellyfish among the boats.

See?

photo by Orion Tippens

Some years ago, I took these pictures (more below). I’m still astounded and felt the need to share them. Jellyfish are strange, interesting creatures. They are classified as plankton, not fish. They have existed on this earth long before humans and dinosaurs. They can reproduce sexually, and asexually. They have no brains, respiratory systems. or central nervous systems. They live through a network of connected nerves, and are commonly composed of at least 90% water.

To find them in swarms so close to civilization is surreal. I just walked around one quiet morning. Surprise, everywhere.

photo by Orion Tippens

photo by Orion Tippens

photo by Orion Tippens

I’m not sure on the further details on what kind these are. I think these are commonly known as sea nettle jellyfish. They sting humans, paralyze smaller creatures. You can find these, among other types of Jellyfish at the nearby Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Here’s a cool video found from the Youtube:

Favorite Lighthouses of the California Coast

I love lighthouses.

Lighthouses save lives. They symbolize hope. They are beautiful, simple in purpose and design. For California, these add points of adventure and excitement to its majestic coastline.

Here are five favorite California lighthouses. All still in operation, accessible on the outside at least.