Breaking down the days behind

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Here, I observe the destructiveness of change, swift and ruthless to some things our new civilization stopped caring about.

I see the dust from a crushing of metal and wood once assembled with care and love. Now, this structure once proud, crushed by monsters with mighty jaws that mash and crunch.

For many months, I walked by this empty building on Olive and Boren, next to the Convention Place Tunnel Station in downtown Seattle. It was a corner spot, two or three stories tall, with blue triming and giant painted birds upon one side. Both side, dirty glass barely reflecting the growing world outside. I know nothing of its history, but I would guess the inside space for a vehicle showtoom, or dance studio. Stuck to another side, a dreaded Notice of Proposed Land Use sign, its mark of doom. The building remained unhabited on the inside, but still a some life on the outside…

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Coming home last week, I walked down the Pine street from Capitol Hill. I could see the clearing out and tearing bits off the Convention Center Tunnel Station. No more waiting in the centered area, as my gateway to buses to the Bellevue, Kent, Lake City area have now scattered to other nearby stops. This is no longer the final stop after the long tunnel rides underneath the good stretch of old Seattle metropolis. I accepted this, as truth that change is constant and not always convenient.

But there, that little building on the corner of the once proud station center suddenly torn down is a sudden shock now. That was an unknown part to my world, a familiar marker to my daily trek, seen often from high and coming down Boren street from Pine.

Now, the building is now mashed and crunched. The monster I watched was vicious, yet precise on which parts to break first. The building is barely recognizable, and I almost looked away.

But, I should not. There is that reminder on the swiftness off a changing city, where the buildings of old are suddenly gone, with no respect towards what they brought to the past. The familiarity they brought to people’s live, are no more. And what comes next, will probably end up less exciting, as I find the new Seattle structures often boring and forgettable.

Meanwhile, cherish other mundane things that can be part of your daily life, for change may come quick, mashed and crunched.

Under the Poison Sky

Seattle has the worst city sky in the world now, according to my news feed lately.

That’s probably right, according to my lungs. There is much smoke in the air now, mainly from wildfires to the north of here in the Cascades region and Canada. The Air Quality Index had the height of the latest round as a unhealthy hazard at 220, which I read is like smoking 7 packs of cigarettes. This might explain why I feel so very relaxed lately.

Right now, the smoke is applying a filter to the partially visible Moon, giving it an eerie red glow. I tried to leave my window open, to let in some nightly air, but ugh…still not good. My small apartment will remain musty for now, as I now go for an extra helping of Chocolate Cherry Bordeaux ice cream. This is not how I imagined my future, but it’s how I must live now.

Tomorrow, I hear the smoke will partly thin out. That’s good, and hopefully an end to this third sequenced year of the mass smoky blanket of hell, rudely interrupting my summer. And then, I think I will appreciate the return of a good clear day, much more.

– Orion T

The Second Sunset past Seven

The best thing about this new daylight saving time change, is more time to savor a good sunset. Especially, with the warm weather.

So I did, behind the Pile Place Market in the new deck area. The shot above is from my phone, with its last bit of battery life before shutting down.

– Orion T

Picture of Today 11/20/2017, The Cold Scene

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I little earlier today in the afternoon, I recall the temperature at 45 degrees (F). The rain was heavy from the morning, and then came a break after with mild winds. Coming out to lunch, I felt the remainder of chill air.

The effect felt refreshing. Not sure why. I think perhaps, there’s something natural about this, mixed with the view of the trees over the fence upon Myrtle Edwards Park, with Elliot Bay in the distance. There, I noticed the leaves nearly gone from the trees, so much more than those of the inner Seattle City. being near the water, I am guessing the winds have done more work here, allowing more cold air to pass through from the sky above.

– Orion T

Picture of Today 9/6/2017, The Troubling Skies

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For the past couple days, the skies throughout the Pacific Northwest have been full of ash and remnants of terrible wildfires from the Oregon state. The result here in the Seattle area is everything looking like a bad Instagram filter and health risks. Still, not as bad as Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Southwest. There, whole islands are now wrecked, with Florida not quite ready for the storm’s violent path.

For now, we must endure wherever we are, until things get better. Here in Seattle, there is a 10%-20% chance of rain, which will help clear the skies and clean things down. Such chances are not the best, but holding on to hope is the best one we can do. As for the other end of the US, we hope for a diminished end of Hurricane Irma…sooner the better. And the hopes don’t end there. We just keep praying or whatever us humans do, for peaceful and clear days.

– Orion T

The picture above is of the Pioneer Square area of Seattle. Here, you have one of two quick shots from my smartphone, then I kept my mouth closed and hurried home.