Looking at some Romanesco Broccoli

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I past by some interesting, and larger sized broccoli at Sosio’s Produce inside Pike Place Market in Seattle. Only $4.99 a pound for this, and what the signed said was “Organic Italian Broccoli Romanesco.”

According to a Wikipedia entry on Romanesco broccoli, it has grown in Italy since the 16th century. Also known:

“Romanesco superficially resembles a cauliflower, but it is chartreuse in color, and its form is strikingly fractal in nature. The inflorescence (the bud) is self-similar in character, with the branched meristems making up a logarithmic spiral. In this sense the bud’s form approximates a natural fractal; each bud is composed of a series of smaller buds, all arranged in yet another logarithmic spiral. This self-similar pattern continues at several smaller levels. The pattern is only an approximate fractal since the pattern eventually terminates when the feature size becomes sufficiently small. The number of spirals on the head of Romanesco broccoli is a Fibonacci number.”

Fascinating!

– Orion T

The Second Sunset past Seven

The best thing about this new daylight saving time change, is more time to savor a good sunset. Especially, with the warm weather.

So I did, behind the Pile Place Market in the new deck area. The shot above is from my phone, with its last bit of battery life before shutting down.

– Orion T

The Outside In

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The sun was an inviting element to this particular past weekend for 2018. I think this was the first time of this year, where the Emerald City got complete sunshine for both Saturday and Sunday.

Or, at least that what I have noticed while not being indoors for most this weekend. I walked around a lot through downtown and the waterfront on errands and eating. But particularly striking was the Central Library in the early afternoon. I was there to finish my taxes and check out some movies. The light of the sun directly shined through, causing the revealing pattern shadows on the floor. I had to take a picture (see above).

Then, the only movie I checked out was Alien: Covenant. I watched it later, and felt no excitement. That movie is super boring and put me to sleep.

– Orion T

It’s just the rain…

“I went to bed and woke in the middle of the night thinking I heard someone cry, thinking I myself was weeping, and I felt my face and it was dry. Then I looked at the window and thought: Why, yes, it’s just the rain, the rain, always the rain, and turned over, sadder still, and fumbled about for my dripping sleep and tried to slip it back on.”

― Ray Bradbury,
Green Shadows, White Whale: A Novel of Ray Bradbury’s Adventures Making Moby Dick with John Huston in Ireland

The picture is a from a recent hour at a bus stop, using a camera with just enough battery life to capture this moment in Downtown Seattle.

Orion T

Outside the Amazon Spheres

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Live in Seattle, and you will eventually notice the overwhelming presence of Amazon. I mean this, because of the influence the mega-dominating capitalist empire carries, with its growing tech culture and innovation, here at a high price for the locals here.

Now stands the Amazon Spheres, an enclosed botanical paradise for some of its highest privileged employees. A forest world of its own, with a large variety of plants, waterfalls, and trees; all contained within an architectural wonder of curved glass and complicated steelwork.

This bonkers modern construction is the newest developed centerpiece for the many surrounding Amazon buildings towering over the city (and much blocking the view of the Space Needle for us regular folk). Its light after sunset illuminates Amazon’s current prosperity to its many local highly paid tech-workers, as they gather their food at the nearby Amazon Go shop, or the Whole Foods Market a few blocks away (now owned by Amazon).

The building is cool to look at, but I think would be more impressive if it stood for more than its company name. I have more to say on this, especially after visiting the inside of one of those spheres.

More on that, soon.

– Orion T

 

The crazy truth of carrots

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Carrots are not always orange. This popular vegetable can appear in white, yellow, red, and purple.

The orange color is popular and well-known, said to be the result of 17th-century Dutch farmers who selectively bred the orange variants in a higher quantity, to symbolize the Netherlands through its nation’s chosen color and independence.

Before them, carrots have been known for its many colors and grown as a food source around the world. The color is dependent on the wavelength of light they absorb, creating the natural pigments. They still do, but the orange ones remain the most popular for being an excellent source of beta-carotene in its natural pigment.

Also, popularized in modern times by the famous cartoon rabbit, Bugs Bunny.  His original voice actor, Mel Blanc, did not like carrots and spit them out while eating them in voicing sessions.

I like them because they are filling, and a healthy way to rid hunger while avoiding fast food.

– Orion T 

The picture above was taken a stand at Seattle’s Pike Place Market, where you can buy some of these unusual carrots.