Adding joy to a gloomy day…

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Bubbles work.

Though, I think it’s more of a visual cue of the senses to enjoy the magic of trapped air in compressed water molecules amplified by soap particles that decrease the surface tension of its expanded exterior. A quick Internet engine search gave information links to vague notions of bubble therapy, leading to some ideas that positive vibes can be raised from its process. Bubbles are a special kind of magic, that science explains but doesn’t really bring to mind any complex process for the joy one finds in their strange, gravity-resistant behavior.

There seen, is some appreciation of seeing life in shorts spurts of existence, momentary freedom. Observe the span of such beautiful fragile life, as its memory will echo further into the mind’s gallery of abstract concepts, in wait to be revived again.

– Orion T

The picture above is from a few weeks ago at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle’s Capitol Hill district, of which I took. The bubbles came from a large wand dipped in a small bucket, waved by a cool and free-spirited heavily-tattooed young man. 

Take me out to the ball game!

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This recent Saturday evening was not a great time for the Seattle Mariners, our local baseball team. This major league team played the Minnesota Twins and lose 4-18 by the end of a long night. The Mariners hasn’t been a top tier team of recent years but still has its fans, and many were there for support.

I among them would root for the home team, boo the many knockout hits of the other, and laughed at the numerous foul balls smacked into the side setting. To help cheer up attendees at the T-mobile Stadium, bobbleheads were given out of the Hall of Hame MVPer Ken Griffey Jr.

Overall, a good time though most of us here would have preferred a victory.

The next day, the Mariners won a comeback, beating the Twins 7-4.

– Orion T

Tearing down the Alaskan Way Viaduct

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The former State Route 99 freeway through Seattle, also known by the waterfront as the Alaskan Way Viaduct is finally coming down. Originally, its construction began in 1949, completed its first version in 1953, then carried on until earlier this year.  In its final full year, the Alaskan Way Viaduct could carry up to 91,000 vehicles per day. But sadly, the viaduct could no longer sustain as it was considered unsafe, and prone to a heavy earthquake. So, away it must go.

In place, will be a lengthy waterfront park area, and I think some new driving lanes. The site will be an overall facelift for this changing metropolis.

– Orion T

 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Marching in 2019

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We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back.” ― Martin Luther King Jr., I Have a Dream: Writings and Speeches That Changed the World

Today, a beautiful day in honor of the great civil rights leader, Martin Luther King Jr. Many had the day off and joined others at special marches across the US.  Seattle represented itself well where thousands took over many blocks, giving tribute and spreading many of Martin Luther King Jr’s messages on racial prejudice, economic inequality, social injustice and change, the effects of war, the need for peace, education, and much more.

Among them, I felt a great optimism of such strength in numbers, that we can move forward for the better. But, there is still a lot of work to be done, after the marching is over.

– Orion T

 

Breaking down the days behind

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Here, I observe the destructiveness of change, swift and ruthless to some things our new civilization stopped caring about.

I see the dust from a crushing of metal and wood once assembled with care and love. Now, this structure once proud, crushed by monsters with mighty jaws that mash and crunch.

For many months, I walked by this empty building on Olive and Boren, next to the Convention Place Tunnel Station in downtown Seattle. It was a corner spot, two or three stories tall, with blue triming and giant painted birds upon one side. Both side, dirty glass barely reflecting the growing world outside. I know nothing of its history, but I would guess the inside space for a vehicle showtoom, or dance studio. Stuck to another side, a dreaded Notice of Proposed Land Use sign, its mark of doom. The building remained unhabited on the inside, but still a some life on the outside…

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Coming home last week, I walked down the Pine street from Capitol Hill. I could see the clearing out and tearing bits off the Convention Center Tunnel Station. No more waiting in the centered area, as my gateway to buses to the Bellevue, Kent, Lake City area have now scattered to other nearby stops. This is no longer the final stop after the long tunnel rides underneath the good stretch of old Seattle metropolis. I accepted this, as truth that change is constant and not always convenient.

But there, that little building on the corner of the once proud station center suddenly torn down is a sudden shock now. That was an unknown part to my world, a familiar marker to my daily trek, seen often from high and coming down Boren street from Pine.

Now, the building is now mashed and crunched. The monster I watched was vicious, yet precise on which parts to break first. The building is barely recognizable, and I almost looked away.

But, I should not. There is that reminder on the swiftness off a changing city, where the buildings of old are suddenly gone, with no respect towards what they brought to the past. The familiarity they brought to people’s live, are no more. And what comes next, will probably end up less exciting, as I find the new Seattle structures often boring and forgettable.

Meanwhile, cherish other mundane things that can be part of your daily life, for change may come quick, mashed and crunched.

Days of the San Diego Comic Con 2018 past…

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Since last reported of my arrival in San Diego, I attended the San Diego Comic Con for the 24th year in an annual row. Much happened there, mostly fun and networking among creative work appreciators and proprietors..

Some of my experience is shared through strangerworlds.com, another site I write for. You are invited to read Part 1 of my commentary with pics. Check it out here.

That’s all for now. More happened since the Comic Con, which I will eventually get around to sharing.  That’s a promise.

– Orion T

 

The Super Blue No-Moon Eclipse

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Stupid cloud cover…

So, I got up early this morning at 4:30 am, and headed to the Seattle waterfront (on Pier 66, upper level), to see the once in a lifetime combo of the Moon being a full Super, Blue, and Lunar Eclipse. The sight would have been amazing, given the reflection of the Elliot Bay waters and possible surrounding clouds.

Sadly, the distant cloud layer was too thick and overbearing, hogging the vision to itself. You could see a little glow from the moonlight above the mountains, and that was all for the duration until Moonset. The air was cold but shared nearby with other disappointed persons. We stared, and made the most of the moment, talking and chuckling at teasing of reddish moonlight.

Well, there will be more rare happenings to behold, or not. But what matters is that I was ready for either.

– Orion T