Observing the revealing dead life at Rattlesnake Lake

img_2189

It’s been six years since I last visited Rattlesnake Lake, a wonderful little body of water by North Bend, Washington. There were, and still no actual rattlesnakes there. The origin of its name is said to be from the sound of the seed pods of the local camas flower, drying out in the wind.

There is something much more interesting than its name. Here, was a small town over 100 years ago here, named Moncton in 1907 (formally Cedar Falls). The town did not last long, as it was built near a reservoir, taking in water through a very faulty dam. The floodwaters took over the town, as the settlers evacuated. Until 1915, the town was officially no more. Rattlesnake Lake took over.

You can find more on that story, here.

Much later, and more recently of last weekend, I visited Rattlesnake Lake. I was hoping for some peace and quiet on perhaps maybe the last sunny day of the year. To my surprise, I found the lake to have lost much of its water. A local told me it’s been ongoing, from the current changing climate, bringing in dryer days.

The view of the lake revealed a dramatic change, as a result.

Now shown, are many tree stumps and tree remnants from its days of heavy logging for the nearby former town.  It’s an awesome, fresh site to see so many scattered about. Stop and study the area, you’ll find some odd formations. One can easily imagine this alien landscape, perhaps inspire new tales of fantasy and maybe new spooky tales.

I trampled through some fresh mud to get a closer look, explore for different angles to its fantastic revelations. I took pictures, some presented below…

731a931c-b37c-4e08-b41d-e91ff52241ec0bce48eb-d54d-4d26-945e-1d31b5a6bf43img_2188img_2198

img_2213img_2232d51d843b-bacd-49a1-81b3-48ad7e290deb

I highly recommend a visit to those around the Seattle area. There is a nice hourly scenic hike, a pleasant nearby park, and other interesting things to check out. It’s close to North Bend, where the cult TV show Twin Peaks was filmed. Also nearby, are many more points of interest around here. I may share in the near future on some favorites, as I will definitely return to North Bend in the future.

For more on Rattlesnake Lake, including visiting info, click here.

– Orion T

Abalone Cove Shoreline Park, up close…

Continued from my last post, here are some closer views below of Abalone Cove Shoreline Park and Ecological Preserve, off the coast of Southern California in Rancho Palos Verde. I explored near the Sacred Cave with longtime friends, during my very short stay in the South Los Angeles region. I wanted something different, and here we are…




Overall, a sweet and peaceful place for shore explorers and tide-pool enthusiasts. I remained wet, and glad I had the right shoes for stepping over the many rocks and watery holes. The tide was low, enough..

If interested, check out the official www.rpvca.gov page for more info, warnings, and area closures.

– Orion T

The Warning Signs

Photo Jul 24, 3 39 18 PM (1)

I’ve been a little late in my postings lately, as this summer is busy and full of unexpected happenings.

But, I did take some time out for a few little adventures, while i stayed for week in Southern California in late July. One place there in particular, had my attention for a half day, Abalone Cove Shoreline Park, a wonderful stretch of coastal preserve north of Long Beach, close to San Pedro. Once there, much of the area is easy to miss with the road access high and paralleling the clifftops, with small parking lots and vista points. The trails down to the waters are not obvious.

20180724_144410

Yet, with a little exploring and walking further from the parking area and picnic tables, there are signs of access and danger. One just needs to needs to heed the warnings and find the right access point, and continue to heed the warnings…

5bd73439-a8a0-4fc3-9ab6-6fe8002e9145

a7fdc381-d738-4d83-bbab-4a747fdbdd44

Photo Jul 24, 2 43 40 PM

I did go with a few friends, of which some were familiar and knowledgeable of the area. The whole time, very worthwhile and lots of fun. Most of the danger was just being careful and being very aware of the your surroundings, weather and tides.  I shall post more on this, sometime this week.

– Orion T

Along the way, deep into the forest trail

img_5892

I recently posted about my hike to Annette Lake, a serene lake high in the mountainous region of the Mt.Baker-Snoqualmie forest.

The lake being serene and amazing, was enough to behold for its own posting. Now, I would like to share a bit more on its trail to and back. It’s a path as awesome as its destination.

The 7.5-mile round trip Annette Lake trail has wonderous sights, rich in the best of the Pacific Northwest nature land preservations, and another reason I love the Washington State. Here, dedicated hikers will step across towering huddled trees, fallen trees with new life taking upon, rocks of all ages, countless waterfalls, old wooden bridges, and patches of snow along the top in this late spring.

The sunlight through the blue sky intensified the green, illuminated darker pathways partially covered full-grown branches, and gave sparkles to the streams of water running down. You can also enjoy the sounds of the trail varied from noisy waterfalls, chirping birds up high, and peaceful void of preserved stillness.

Here are some choice pics along the path…

 

Overall, the Lake Annette Trail is a good hike I highly recommend for those physically able to withstand a moderate uphill exercise binge, with a worthwhile destination of the lake itself to rest for a bit.

My tips for the trail: go early, so you’ll have time to rest and enjoy some views. Bring a water bottle or two, with snacks of nuts and dried fruit. Go in a group, and maybe bring your dog (allowed on the trail). Wear good hiking shoes fit for stepping over small rocky pathways and snow patches. Don’t rush, as parts of the path are narrow, and other hikers will be frequently passing on the good days. Much of the path is upon step hillsides, with an easy fall into deadly grounds. Rest easy at the lake for a good time before heading back.

For more on the Lake Annette Trail, visit the official Washington Trails site at www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/annette-lake.

– Orion T

The stunning sight of Annette Lake

img_6059

Recently, I set upon a long hike in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Regional Forest with a group, to Annette Lake.

The sight itself deserves my special posting as an amazing visual spot, high up in the mountainous regions of the middle Washington State. The lake is medium size, with much of its surrounding area closed off to visitors. There is no man-made developed shore area or plank, just some natural spots for viewers to appreciate the still serene beauty and untouched landscape. Stepping in the water at this time felt icey, as we heeded warnings to not proceed further in.

Here is a low-grade panoramic shot from my phone:

20180527_131131.jpg

The only way to reach Annette Lake is through a 7.5-mile round trip trail. Half the hike is uphill through a deep forest mountainside over switchbacks, small waterfalls, and a little snow up high. The elevation gain is about 1800 ft, where the lake signals the peak and destination of the trail.

I advise good hiking boots for the path, and for the current time while the snow sits up high..bring trekking poles. The trail is well maintained and easy to follow, though one should take it slow with its rocky parts and slippy elevation. Dogs are welcome on the trail, as many brought their canine companions.

My friend’s dog Ruby joined our group, who enjoyed the snow part very much.

img_5961

The Annette Lake trail itself offers more interesting distant views, of which I will share in another posting, soon.

Meanwhile, to anyone interested in checking out Lake Annette and the trail to it, visit the official site for more info, at www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/annette-lake.

– Orion T

 

 

Colorful Gardens at the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

img_5430

I recently visited the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival in Northern Washington State on a gray day this April. Some of that was detailed in my previous post, Colorful Views…). As amazing as the tulip fields were, I was also impressed by the Roozengaarde display garden area. Here, there are “90+ varieties of tulips and over 150 flower bulb varieties in total. Included are tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, crocus, muscari and other specialty flowers.”

The colors this time of year stand out, and a worthwhile attraction for tourists and locals in the Pacific Northwest. According to its website at tulips.com, the display garden is open all year round. Seeing these with the fields during the festival, is just an added bonus.

I now share some pics of the wonderful display garden below (click on each for the bigger picture):

The admiration and picture-taking was a joy, but personally seeing this for yourself is the best experience, especially with friends or family. For more info, click here and check out the Roozengaarde official site at Tulips.com for more info about tulips and purchase options

– Orion T

 

 

An early sign of Spring

img_8024

I can see a small hint of the coming season.

The cold winter can only last so long, and there is still more than a month of that to go. In wait, I will enjoy the naked trees, the grey moody skies, the wetter streets after a quiet rain. I love the new days as the dawn steadily rises a little earlier, and the set is bit more patient.

Meanwhile, I notice to the side as I walk. Some of the buds are peeking out, getting ready. No rush for the year to move forward, but I shall welcome this next Spring.

– Orion T