Picture of Today 12/3/2017, Holiday Bright

I was hoping for something bright in the sky, being the day for a new Supermoon event. But, the dense clouds have made seeing that too difficult. So being around the usual downtown, I settled for the biggest shining light seen every Holiday season here in Seattle, easily seen best from the Westlake Center.

This, as seen above in the picture) is the Macy’s Holiday Star, a 160-foot-tall, 60-foot-wide star with 3,800 bulbs and a large 1,000-watt bulb in the center bulb, lit from around Thanksgiving time till New Year’s Day. This giant star has been a local tradition since 1957, only skipping the 1973 year because of an electricity crisis at the time. You’ll see it high above on the corner of 4th and Pine, upon the Macy’s building.

Enjoy this light when you see it, because it’s wonderfully bright, grand, and closer to the Earth.

-Orion T

Pictures of Today 11/26/2017, Lights-Go-Round

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Today, after the sun fell, I passed by a special carousel in Seattle’s downtown Westlake Center, which only comes out for the holiday season around here. I had my good camera with me and took the above picture.

I enjoy the beauty of unfocused lights, as this setting gave much to the eye in variety and sizes. I love every megapixel of this moment. So much loved, I didn’t bother with cropping and or editing the result.

I then shot another picture, this time further our and focused, seconds before someone jumped on the horse…

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There is a special brilliance of a great carousel when fully illuminated at night. You see one, take a moment to stop and appreciate. Then maybe, go for a ride.

– Orion T

 

Picture of Today 11/20/2017, The Cold Scene

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I little earlier today in the afternoon, I recall the temperature at 45 degrees (F). The rain was heavy from the morning, and then came a break after with mild winds. Coming out to lunch, I felt the remainder of chill air.

The effect felt refreshing. Not sure why. I think perhaps, there’s something natural about this, mixed with the view of the trees over the fence upon Myrtle Edwards Park, with Elliot Bay in the distance. There, I noticed the leaves nearly gone from the trees, so much more than those of the inner Seattle City. being near the water, I am guessing the winds have done more work here, allowing more cold air to pass through from the sky above.

– Orion T

A wonderful Pop-Up dinner on a rainy night.

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Sometimes, a night needs to be different and special for no particular reason. Find an opportunity, to enjoy a couple hours with good food among strangers and friends. If it centers around dinner, all the better.

Such was last Sunday evening at Peleton Cafe in Seattle’s Central District, while the rain poured down outside. I arrived by invitation to a special dinner event hosted by my good friend Megan Davies, certified holistic chef and health educator.  There, happened one of her Tigress Nutritional Support Pop-Up Dinners, hosted monthly. With each event, Megan provides and cooks to those present in four courses of tasty, nourishing, healthy food dishes (and gluten-free with vegan alternative options).

So, here is what I had (as shown in pictures below): Teaser: Sweet potato, coconut bacon and avocado canapes with burdock kimchee. Starter: oyster and maitake mushroom bisque. Main: French lentil, pork shoulder and fennel pesto (alternative not shown, chanterelle, pear and pumpkinseed Fettuccine with garden herbs and spinach). Dessert: pumpkin mousse with coconut whip and pecans. Libations were added, containing a helping of malus cranberry ginger beer (not shown).

Overall, a fantastic night. Besides the food, guests are encouraged to greet and meet others at the tables, especially strangers. That I also did and made new friends at that good time.

– Orion T

For more info on the Tigress Nutritional Support Pop-Up Dinners held in Seattle, visit http://www.tigressnutritionalsupport.com, and click on the Pop-Up tab (next one is December 10th). Seats are by ticket, and extremely limited. Send me a note if you attend. I may see you there!

Hey Man, it’s Rainin’

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Hey man, take a look out the window ‘n’ see what’s happenin’
Hey man, it’s rainin’
It’s rainin’ outside man
Aw, don’t worry ’bout that
Everything’s gonna be everything
We’ll get into somethin’ real nice you know
Sit back and groove on a rainy day

– Jimi Hendrix, “Rainy Day, Dream Away”

The above picture was taken by me during a recent day in the rain, in Downtown Seattle. It was a good day.

– Orion T

 

Picture of Today 10/31/2017, Halloween Spirit

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Happy Halloween from here in Seattle…

Sadly, I did not dress up for this year’s spooky season. Sadly, I was not feeling heavy in the spirit. But, I saw many out there who were definitely in the Halloween spirit. Here in Seattle, this time was good for going outside in costume. Especially, being that we had no rain on this day, the first in 11 years since the Emerald City streets were wet for Trick or Treaters.

I took a few pictures of some dressed for the day…

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An undead cop, with excellent makeup done by Brian Flynn (@aglasscannon on Instagram).

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Morpheus, at the Goodwill store in Cap Hill.  Ask him, and he will offer a choice of the red or blue pill. Choose wisely.

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A group of jellyfish passing me by.

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That’s all for now. I enjoyed the spirit of Halloween silliness passing by, and that is enough. Cheers and Happy Halloween!

– Orion T

 

 

Fall Colors in the Kubota Garden

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For those dwelling around in the Pacific Northwest, there is a medium-sized park, open to the public in Seattle, to view the best seasonal colors in nature. You should go there now, while the scenery is very Fall-tastic.

This place is the Kubota Garden, a 20-acre Japanese garden in the Rainier Beach neighborhood. The park is named after Fujitaro Kubota, a Japanese emigrant and horticultural pioneer who blended his Japanese design techniques with North American materials here, starting off in 1927. Fujitaro died in 1973 at age 94, hoping the land would eventually become public. In 1981, the land became a historic landmark.  In 1987, the land became public, and since became an attraction for visitors. In late 2017, it was my turn.

Kubota Garden is beautiful with every step inside. The walkways are crooked and intertwined, leading to little sights worth a long gaze. Such are small ponds, little structures of wood and rock, bridges, waterfalls, with a variety of uncommon trees and shrubbery. All quiet and peaceful, leaving the noise of the world to the distance.

I came here on the advice of a friend, who suggested this as a place to relax, and avoid the troubles of the world for at least an hour. By public transport, this was an easy destination (about an hour if taking the rail from downtown, then a short bus transfer). I arrived, not considering the grandness of the place, or a map.

This brought me much joy in the heart, to explore, and not finding any particular pattern or sense to the pathways of the place. I felt lost and didn’t want to be found for a while. I found many little partially mossed benches, shadowy coverings by spidery trees, and open grassy spots perfect for a picnic. I would stop here and there, sitting down and watching birds and dogs being walked by. And perfect for this day, was the amazing colors of the Fall season, with an awesome variety in every view.

The only regret here is my arrival so very late in the day. The evening was close, and I had to leave for a meeting. I did take some pictures, showing the amazing Fall-ness of it all. Click on each for a full look:

I shall come back here again, for a longer visit and for every season.

-Orion T